Joe Kubert

Sinister House of Secret Love v1 #3, 1972 - A young woman travels to a meet a handsome but reclusive foreigner in this gothic romance tale. In one of his longest stories for DC, Alex Toth demonstrates a mastery of pacing and page design. Like many of his bronze age efforts, his style is streamlined and graphic, while conveying the complex moods of the characters. Several noteworthy panels include the symbolic correspondence of the characters on page 6, their silent first embrace on page 9 (see interior page shown below), and the abstract shadows of a leafy canopy on page 15. The cameo-shaped cover design is beautifully painted, but the artist is unknown to me. This is number 1 of 1 Sinister House of Secret Love issues with Toth art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"Bride of the Falcon" Toth story pencils (Frank Giacoia inks, Doug Wildey partial inks) 36 pages = ****

Alex Toth
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Toth / Secrets of Sinister House
>this issue >Toth >Sinister House of Secret Love
Teen-age Diary Secrets v1 #6, 1949 - In "I Played Kiss and Run", young Joyce learns that dating several boys at once earns you a reputation as a tease. "My Wrong Approach for Romance" tells of a coed who tries to gain maturity by turning into a smart sophisticate. Matt Baker capably illustrates both tales, still honing his skills within this relatively new genre. The lackluster opening panels certainly don't help. These stories were later reprinted in Diary Secrets #12. This rare comic also features a young Marilyn Monroe on the cover, a detail overlooked by comic book price guides. This is number 3 of 6 Teen-Age Diary Secrets issues with Baker art and/or covers. 
- - - - - - - - - -
"I Played Kiss and Run" Baker story pencils and inks 8 pages = **
"My Wrong Approach for Romance" Baker story pencils (Ray Osrin inks) 8 pages = **

Matt Baker

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Baker / Teen-Age Diary Secrets
>this issue >Baker >Teen-Age Diary Secrets
Green Lantern v2 #129 dc comic book cover art by Jim Starlin
Jim Starlin
Green Lantern v2 #129, 1980 - Jim Starlin's cover uses symmetry to emphasize the title character's two identities. While not an uncommon layout, it appears more appropriate in this context. The photograph in the background offers a textural contrast to the foreground, but overall it's a poor substitute for further detailed drawings. Other artists in this issue include Joe Staton and Frank McLaughlin. This is number 1 of 2 Green Lantern issues with Starlin art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Starlin cover pencils and inks = **

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Starlin / Green Lantern
>this issue >Starlin >Green Lantern
John Byrne
Alpha Flight v1 #13, 1984 - In the wake of Guardian's death, Heather holds a funeral for her fallen husband with all of Alpha Flight in attendance. As the cover shows, Wolverine guests stars in this issue. Arguably his best work of the series, John Byrne employs silent panels and open borders for the first half of "Nightmare". The pages are deftly drawn and perfectly sequenced. Additionally, his haunting opening splash is a direct homage to artist Jim Steranko. This is number 13 of 28 Alpha Flight issues with Byrne art and/or covers. 
- - - - - - - - - -
Byrne cover pencils and inks = ***
"Nightmare" Byrne story pencils and inks 22 pages = *****

John Byrne
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Byrne / Alpha Flight
>this issue >Byrne >Alpha Flight
Conan the Barbarian v1 #10 marvel comic book cover art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
Conan the Barbarian v1 #10, 1971 - The first of two longer page-count issues, Conan enters a bejeweled city and joins up with a fellow thief from his past. Barry Smith's drawings crowd most of the small panels, but not without interest or excitement. Decorative flourishes abound, especially in scenes of sorcery and fantastic creatures. Smith's pensive opening splash depicts Conan and his female companion at the city gates, firmly establishing the setting and tone of the story. The issue also contains a King Kull back-up story, one of his earliest appearances in comics. This is number 10 of 22 Conan the Barbarian issues with Smith art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Smith cover pencils and inks = ***
"Beware the Wrath of Anu"
Smith story pencils 24 pages = ***

Conan the Barbarian v1 #10 marvel comic book page art by Barry Windsor Smith
Barry Windsor Smith
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Smith / Conan
>this issue >Smith >Conan the Barbarian

Walt Disney's Comics and Stories v1 #57, 1945 - With a thousand dollar prize at stake, Donald Duck and crew head to the woods to photograph an iron-billed woodpecker, the rarest bird in the world. Even in an woodsy setting, Carl Barks illustrates the flora and fauna with great care. His realistic shading brings detail and depth to many of the scenes. Many of the best gags feature Donald's tantrums (see interior page below), which seem to increase in expressiveness with each issue. Other artists in this issue include Walt Kelly. 
- - - - - - - - - -
Untitled Barks story pencils and inks 10 pages = ***

Carl Barks
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Barks / Walt Disney's Comics and Stories
>this issue >Barks >Walt Disney's Comics and Stories
Walt Simonson
Star Wars v1 #16, 1978 - Walt Simonson's first effort on the series begins with a promising cover: a careful montage of characters (including Han Solo, Luke Skywalker, Chewbacca and C3P0) around a central figure. Unfortunately, his work falters on the interior story. Simonson's typically dynamic style appears on the opening splash and pages 17-18 (see interior page). Most of his pencils, however, struggle to be seen through the domineering inks. This is number 1 of 18 Star Wars issues with Simonson art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -

Simonson cover pencils and inks = ***
"The Hunter"
Simonson story pencils (Bob Wiacek inks) 17 pages = **
 

Walt Simonson
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / SimonsonStar Wars
>this issue >Simonson >Star Wars
Jack Kirby
Hi-School Romance v1 #55, 1956 - On this Jack Kirby cover, a young woman shows disapproval when a prettier girl catches her boyfriend's eye. While straightforward in theme, the artist adds some splendid touches. The gothic arch in the background suggests a church more than a high school. Its shape also visually connects the two interested parties. Note the lightning bolts on the blonde's dress, suggesting a spark perhaps? Kirby's efforts are augmented by a talented, uncredited inker. This is number 2 of 5 Hi-School Romance issues with Kirby art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Kirby cover pencils = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Kirby / Hi-School Romance
>this issue >Kirby >Hi-School Romance

Batman Family v1 #13, 1977 - Unlike previous issues, the storylines in both the Robin/Batgirl and Man-Bat features converge toward the book's end. Don Newton is tasked with drawing the first eight and last thirteen pages. With the exception of the crowded opening splash, his layouts are both energetic and innovative. In particular, the motorcycle racing scenes capture the speed and frenetic pace perfectly (this story was later reprinted in Best of DC #51). By comparison, Marshall Rogers' pencils are somewhat diminished by the thick lines of inker Bob Wiacek (especially the villain's rendition on page 13). That aside, most of the panels and pages are impeccably designed and even include a subtle Neal Adams swipe on page 15, panel 2. Other artists in this issue include Jim Aparo (cover). This number 1 of 1 Batman Family issues with Newton art and/or covers and number 3 of 3 Batman Family issues with Rogers art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"The Man who Melted Manhattan" Newton story pencils (Bob Wiacek inks) 21 pages = ***
"Twilight of the Sunset Gang" Rogers story pencils (Bob Wiacek inks) 8 pages = ***


Don Newton
Marshall Rogers

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Newton / Batman Family
>this issue >Newton >Rogers >Batman Family
Jeff Jones
Nightmare v3 #6, 1973 - Astride a winged iguana, a warrior woman basks in the air of an impending storm. Jeff Jones adds the crackle of electricity behind her to heighten the effect. In the far distance, he sets another reptile is against the full moon, deepening the picture plane. Like his other paintings, this cover benefits from his rich, complex color palette. Other artists in this issue include Mike Kaluta and Ernie Colon. This is number 1 of 1 Nightmare issues with Jones art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Jones cover painting = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Jones / Nightmare
>this issue >Jones >Nightmare


Deadman v1 #41985 - Printed on Baxter paper, this series re-presents the first Deadman stories from the late 1960s. Almost all feature Neal Adams art, some of his earliest works for DC comics. Specifically, this edition reprints stories from Witching Hour #8, Strange Adventures #211 and #212 (including the cover).

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Adams / Deadman
>this issue >Adams >Deadman
Swamp Thing v1 #14 1970s bronze age dc comic book cover art by Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo
Swamp Thing v1 #14, 1975 - Driven to fear, a small community turns violently toward a trio of mutated children. Nestor Redondo does his best work yet on the series, opening with an incredible two page spread of the Swamp Thing beset by villagers. The scene is logically divided into two components that come together to form a cohesive whole. The artist maintains an extraordinary level of detail throughout the book. Some of the most beautifully illustrated pages include the mutant's past history (told within borderless, dream-like panels) and the spectacular full page splash of an enormous ant (see interior page below). This is number 4 of 13 Swamp Thing issues with Redondo art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Redondo cover pencils and inks = ***
"The Tomorrow Children" Redondo story pencils and inks 20 pages = *****

Swamp Thing v1 #14 1970s bronze age dc comic book page art by Nestor Redondo
Nestor Redondo
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / original page / Redondo top10Swamp Thing
>this issue >Redondo >Swamp Thing

Marvel Classics Comics v1 #2, 1976 - I had always thought that Alex Nino's style was well suited for the science fiction genre. This adaptation of the H. G. Wells classic only reinforces my opinion. One of this lengthiest tales, this splendid Nino effort is actually a reprint of the Pendulum Classics paperback (originally printed in black and white). This larger format bolsters his unique futuristic drawings. In addition to two artfully drawn splash pages, the artist also completes a spectacular spread (pages 36-37) of the hero amidst an army of Morlocks. Other artists in this issue include Gil Kane (cover). Compare this issue to the earlier Alex Toth version in Four Color Comics v2 #1085. This is number 1 of 3 Marvel Classics Comics issues with Nino art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"The Time Machine" Nino story pencils and inks 48 pages (first time in color) = ***

Alex Nino
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Nino / Marvel Classics Comics
>this issue >Nino >Marvel Classics Comics
Jim Starlin
Ms. Marvel  v1 #12, 1977 - Encased in crystal, our heroine becomes the prisoner of the evil Elementals. Joining them is the sorceress Hecate, making her debut. Jim Starlin uses a tilted horizon line for a greater dynamic effect. His illustration is crisp and clear with an emphasis on the title character. And he stills manages to squeeze in four more figures into the layout. Other artists in this issue include Sal Buscema and Joe Sinnott. This is number 1 of 1 Ms. Marvel issues with Starlin art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Starlin cover pencils / Joe Rubinstein inks = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Starlin / Ms. Marvel
>this issue >Starlin >Ms. Marvel



Ms. Marvel v1
Marvel
1977-79

1
2-4
5-11
12 - Jim Starlin cover
13-23


- - - - - - - - - -
Home / A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

77 Sunset Strip v1 #1, 1962 - Following a handful of Four Color Comics issues, these LA detectives graduate into their own title. All three stories are approachable, thanks to Russ Manning's confident line. Each tale has its strengths, but the tale of Kookie's accidental exchange with a spy stands out as exceptional. Many scenes occur during the evening, calling for greater contrast and depth. The thin diagonal lines of rain also increase excitement and visual interest (see interior page below). A contents page on the inside front cover borrows panels from each of the respective stories. This is number 5 of 6 77 Sunset Strip issues with Manning art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
"The Mix Up" Manning story pencils and inks 10 pages = ****
"Blaze of Revenge" Manning story pencils and inks 12 pages = ***
"The Ruby Caper " Manning story pencils and inks 9 pages = ***
"It's Manslaughter"/"It's Murder" Manning text illos pencils and inks 1 page = **
"Business World Espionage" Manning i
nside back cover pencils and inks = ***

77 Sunset Strip v1 #1 dell tv 1960s silver age comic book page art by Russ Manning
Russ Manning
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Manning77 Sunset Strip
>this issue >Manning >77 Sunset Strip

Eerie v3 #65, 1975The murderous Hacker returns to London on another killing spree. Following several clues, Lt. Smythe of Scotland Land gains entry into an exclusive gentlemen's club. Alex Toth's drawings are interspersed with ominous shapes. He also employs more than a few visual devices, including a panel dripping with viscous liquid. Not surprisingly, Toth's storytelling skills result in exemplary page designs. Bernie Wrighton contributes the issue's frontispiece: a rendition of Cousin Eerie relaxing in his library of horrors. Beautifully drawn, scene radiates with precise and textural linework (the hot pink color doesn't hurt either). Other artists in this issue include Paul Neary and Jose Ortiz. This is number 8 of 14 Eerie magazine issues with Wrightson art and/or covers (not including reprints).
- - - - - - - - - -
Wrightson inside front cover (duotone) = ****
"The Hacker is Back" Toth story pencils and inks 10 pages (black and white) = ***

Bernie Wrightson
Alex Toth
- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Toth / Wrightson / Eerie
>this issue >Toth >Eerie >Wrightson
Joe Kubert
Ragman v1 #1, 1976 - Ragman makes his first appearance in this issue, along with his prerequisite origin story. Joe Kubert's cover design borrows from an inside page, but its monochromatic washes dampen its impact. Although the interior art is credited to the Redondo Studio, it's clear Kubert provided some rough layouts. Pages 2-8 and 17 are most clearly consistent with his style (see interior page below). On pages 7-8, a rooftop battle is enhanced by strong vertical panels that suggest scale and height. Co-created by Kubert, Ragman also stands out for his unusually distinctive costume design. This is number 1 of 5 Ragman issues with Kubert art and/or covers. 
- - - - - - - - - -
Kubert cover pencils and inks = **
"Origin of the Tatterdemalion" Kubert art/layouts 17 pages = ***

Joe Kubert

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Kubert / Ragman
>this issue >Kubert >Ragman
Walt Simonson
Thor v1 #368, 1986 - While a visage of Thor looks on, Balder the Brave attempts to rescue damsels from their trollish captor. Walt Simonson's cover fills every available space, leaving just enough room for the masthead and headline. Though frenetic at first glance, the layout is actually nicely balanced and constructed. Other artists in this issue include Sal Buscema. This is number 43 of 55 Thor issues with Simonson art and/or covers.
- - - - - - - - - -
Simonson cover pencils and inks = ***

- - - - - - - - - -
Home / Simonson / Thor
>this issue >Simonson >Thor